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Take a moment to observe the fine detail of the egret underglaze painting. Paintings such as this one are achieved by using underglaze, which is "slip" (watered down clay) with added pigment. After the shape of the vase was formed, slip was applied in painstaking detail by airbrush or paintbrush. As opposed to many commercial pottery lines, which used decals or relied on unskilled labor to copy decorations from a pattern book, pieces such as this vase required considerable artistic talent and technical skill. After the portrait was completed, the vase was fired (baked in a kiln), and then a sea-green glaze was applied over top of it. The Sea Green glaze line was formally introduced in the fall of 1894. It is described by Rookwood as an “opalescent sea green relieved by a few flowing warm touches, to a cooler green with bluer accents”.

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Pottery with flag 2
Egret vase
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  DSCN3787_edited.JPG - Take a moment to observe the fine detail of the egret underglaze painting.  Paintings such as this one are achieved by using underglaze, which is "slip" (watered down clay) with added pigment.  After the shape of the vase was formed, slip was applied in painstaking detail by airbrush or paintbrush.  As opposed to many commercial pottery lines, which used decals or relied on unskilled labor to copy decorations from a pattern book, pieces such as this vase required considerable artistic talent and technical skill.  After the portrait was completed, the vase was fired (baked in a kiln), and then a sea-green glaze was applied over top of it.  The Sea Green glaze line was formally introduced in the fall of 1894.  It is described by Rookwood as an “opalescent sea green relieved by a few flowing warm touches, to a cooler green with bluer accents”.  
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